Bengaluru to tackle water crisis with BWSSB and BBMP deciding to construct 2,750 percolation pits

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Published June 27, 2024 at 10:01pm

Update June 27, 2024 at 10:02pm

    BWSSB to construct 2,750 percolation pits

    These pits to be completed by end of 2024

    These pits are aimed to bolster groundwater levels

Amid a severe water crisis this summer, the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) and the Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) have unveiled plans to construct approximately 2,750 percolation pits by the end of 2024 to bolster groundwater levels.

In May, BWSSB initiated the effort by digging 986 percolation pits across the city. BWSSB Chairman V. Ram Prasath Manohar emphasized the need for patience in assessing their impact on groundwater levels. “We must wait until after the monsoon to evaluate the effectiveness of these percolation pits. We will study nearby pits and borewells for a comprehensive understanding,” he reportedly stated. The BWSSB plans to construct an additional 1,000 pits near hospitals and educational institutions, with each pit costing between ₹15,000 and ₹30,000. This phase is expected to be completed by the end of July.

Also read: Bengaluru: BWSSB proposes to revise Cauvery water rates, suggests 30-40% hike

Despite the BWSSB’s advice to government and private agencies to dig percolation pits, the response has been not that great. “We are in discussions with agencies like BMTC, KSRTC, and BMRCL. We can only advocate for implementation; it is up to the department heads to take it forward,” Mr. Manohar noted. BMRCL is the only agency to have responded, initiating a tender process for the construction.

The BBMP, on its part, has dug 500 percolation pits in city parks and plans to add 250 more by December. Initially aiming for 1,000 pits, the project faced funding constraints. “We had planned for 1,000 pits through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) funds, but the sponsoring organization could only support 500,” reportedly explained Chandrashekhar M.R., BBMP Deputy Director (Horticulture). The BBMP will now fund the additional 250 pits, each costing ₹40,000, aiming to recharge groundwater levels and existing borewells.

As Bengaluru confronts its water crisis, these initiatives represent crucial steps toward sustainable water management.

Bengaluru to tackle water crisis with BWSSB and BBMP deciding to construct 2,750 percolation pits

https://newsfirstprime.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/Water-Percolation-Pit.jpg

    BWSSB to construct 2,750 percolation pits

    These pits to be completed by end of 2024

    These pits are aimed to bolster groundwater levels

Amid a severe water crisis this summer, the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) and the Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) have unveiled plans to construct approximately 2,750 percolation pits by the end of 2024 to bolster groundwater levels.

In May, BWSSB initiated the effort by digging 986 percolation pits across the city. BWSSB Chairman V. Ram Prasath Manohar emphasized the need for patience in assessing their impact on groundwater levels. “We must wait until after the monsoon to evaluate the effectiveness of these percolation pits. We will study nearby pits and borewells for a comprehensive understanding,” he reportedly stated. The BWSSB plans to construct an additional 1,000 pits near hospitals and educational institutions, with each pit costing between ₹15,000 and ₹30,000. This phase is expected to be completed by the end of July.

Also read: Bengaluru: BWSSB proposes to revise Cauvery water rates, suggests 30-40% hike

Despite the BWSSB’s advice to government and private agencies to dig percolation pits, the response has been not that great. “We are in discussions with agencies like BMTC, KSRTC, and BMRCL. We can only advocate for implementation; it is up to the department heads to take it forward,” Mr. Manohar noted. BMRCL is the only agency to have responded, initiating a tender process for the construction.

The BBMP, on its part, has dug 500 percolation pits in city parks and plans to add 250 more by December. Initially aiming for 1,000 pits, the project faced funding constraints. “We had planned for 1,000 pits through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) funds, but the sponsoring organization could only support 500,” reportedly explained Chandrashekhar M.R., BBMP Deputy Director (Horticulture). The BBMP will now fund the additional 250 pits, each costing ₹40,000, aiming to recharge groundwater levels and existing borewells.

As Bengaluru confronts its water crisis, these initiatives represent crucial steps toward sustainable water management.

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