From fire retardants to seat foam, cars can be a repository of carcinogenic chemicals!

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Published May 9, 2024 at 1:05pm

    Cars are an integral part of our lives

    But they can be repository of carcinogenic chemicals

    Fire retardants, seat foam are the main culprits

A recent study published in Environmental Science & Technology has uncovered alarming findings regarding the air quality inside our vehicles. The study, conducted across 30 US states, examined cabin air in 101 cars ranging from electric to gas and hybrid models spanning from 2015 to 2022. Shockingly, researchers found that a staggering 99% of the cars tested contained potentially cancer-causing chemicals, including flame retardants such as tris(chloropropyl)phosphate (TCIPP), TCEP, and TDCIPP.

Lead researcher Rebecca Hoehn from Duke University emphasized the significance of this discovery, highlighting the public health risk posed by prolonged exposure to these chemicals. With the average driver spending about an hour in their car daily, concerns are particularly heightened for individuals with long commutes, as well as children who are more vulnerable due to their higher inhalation rates.

The study identified seat foam as the primary source of these carcinogenic substances, originating from outdated safety regulations dating back to the 1970s. Flame retardants, once thought to enhance safety, are now recognized for their limited efficacy and potential harm, especially in the event of a fire.

These findings shed light on a concerning reality: while cars are integral to our daily lives, they may also serve as unwitting reservoirs of cancer-causing chemicals, highlighting the urgent need for updated safety standards and greater awareness among the public.

From fire retardants to seat foam, cars can be a repository of carcinogenic chemicals!

https://newsfirstprime.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/car_1.webp

    Cars are an integral part of our lives

    But they can be repository of carcinogenic chemicals

    Fire retardants, seat foam are the main culprits

A recent study published in Environmental Science & Technology has uncovered alarming findings regarding the air quality inside our vehicles. The study, conducted across 30 US states, examined cabin air in 101 cars ranging from electric to gas and hybrid models spanning from 2015 to 2022. Shockingly, researchers found that a staggering 99% of the cars tested contained potentially cancer-causing chemicals, including flame retardants such as tris(chloropropyl)phosphate (TCIPP), TCEP, and TDCIPP.

Lead researcher Rebecca Hoehn from Duke University emphasized the significance of this discovery, highlighting the public health risk posed by prolonged exposure to these chemicals. With the average driver spending about an hour in their car daily, concerns are particularly heightened for individuals with long commutes, as well as children who are more vulnerable due to their higher inhalation rates.

The study identified seat foam as the primary source of these carcinogenic substances, originating from outdated safety regulations dating back to the 1970s. Flame retardants, once thought to enhance safety, are now recognized for their limited efficacy and potential harm, especially in the event of a fire.

These findings shed light on a concerning reality: while cars are integral to our daily lives, they may also serve as unwitting reservoirs of cancer-causing chemicals, highlighting the urgent need for updated safety standards and greater awareness among the public.

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