Bengaluru: Of the 2 million houses, only less than 2 lakh houses have implemented Rain Water Harvesting

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10-01-2024

    Rs 21.24 crore collected as fines for not implementing rainwater harvesting

    Properties with over 2,400 sq ft area are mandated to adopt RWH

    Preserving rainwater could fulfill half of water demands within BBMP limits

A notable sum of Rs 21.24 crore has been amassed through penalties imposed for non-compliance with rainwater harvesting (RWH) regulations until the conclusion of November last year.

It’s paradoxical that many residents opt to expend this money rather than investing in rainwater harvesting facilities for their homes.

In accordance with the BWSSB Act, properties exceeding 2,400 sq ft and buildings surpassing 1,200 sq ft are mandated to adopt RWH. Within the BWSSB limits, there are approximately 2 million houses, with 10.39 lakh buildings having chosen Cauvery water connection. However, since 2009, only 1,91,383 houses have implemented RWH.

Bengaluru is grappling with a severe water crisis, heavily dependent on Cauvery water pumped from over 100 km away. Experts advocate for the promotion of rainwater harvesting as a crucial measure to mitigate the water crisis.

Bengaluru receives an annual rainfall of 700 to 850 mm. The implementation of RWH has the potential to conserve up to 15 TMC feet of water, which is equivalent to 70% of the city’s water needs.

Rainwater harvesting systems, constructed from inexpensive local materials, can be both simple and effective in most habitable locations. While rooftop rainwater may not be potable and might require treatment before consumption, it can serve various purposes such as flushing toilets, washing clothes, watering the garden, and washing cars.

Experts propose that concerted efforts to preserve rainwater could fulfill half of the water demands within BBMP limits.

Bengaluru: Of the 2 million houses, only less than 2 lakh houses have implemented Rain Water Harvesting

https://newsfirstprime.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/01/Rain-Water-Harvesting.jpg

    Rs 21.24 crore collected as fines for not implementing rainwater harvesting

    Properties with over 2,400 sq ft area are mandated to adopt RWH

    Preserving rainwater could fulfill half of water demands within BBMP limits

A notable sum of Rs 21.24 crore has been amassed through penalties imposed for non-compliance with rainwater harvesting (RWH) regulations until the conclusion of November last year.

It’s paradoxical that many residents opt to expend this money rather than investing in rainwater harvesting facilities for their homes.

In accordance with the BWSSB Act, properties exceeding 2,400 sq ft and buildings surpassing 1,200 sq ft are mandated to adopt RWH. Within the BWSSB limits, there are approximately 2 million houses, with 10.39 lakh buildings having chosen Cauvery water connection. However, since 2009, only 1,91,383 houses have implemented RWH.

Bengaluru is grappling with a severe water crisis, heavily dependent on Cauvery water pumped from over 100 km away. Experts advocate for the promotion of rainwater harvesting as a crucial measure to mitigate the water crisis.

Bengaluru receives an annual rainfall of 700 to 850 mm. The implementation of RWH has the potential to conserve up to 15 TMC feet of water, which is equivalent to 70% of the city’s water needs.

Rainwater harvesting systems, constructed from inexpensive local materials, can be both simple and effective in most habitable locations. While rooftop rainwater may not be potable and might require treatment before consumption, it can serve various purposes such as flushing toilets, washing clothes, watering the garden, and washing cars.

Experts propose that concerted efforts to preserve rainwater could fulfill half of the water demands within BBMP limits.

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