Cryonics: Freezing for future life revival

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29-01-2024

    Dennis Kowalski plans cryogenic preservation after death

    Cryonics freezes bodies for potential future revival

    Procedure involves cooling, replacing blood, freezing

In Milwaukee, a city in Wisconsin state of the USA, a man named Dennis Kowalski, plans to pay $28,000 to have his body cryogenically frozen after he passes away. He is the leader of the Cryonics Institute, a facility in Wisconsin that freezes and preserves deceased individuals. Currently, they have over 200 frozen bodies in their care. 

Cryogenic deep freezing involves preserving the body at very low temperatures to prevent decay and possibly revive it in the future.

Kowalski believes that in a century, we might have the technology to bring people back to life. He thinks it’s worth preserving your body after death because there’s a chance to gain a lot and nothing to lose.

Would you prefer to be cryogenically frozen over being buried or cremated?

Cryonics is a method where human and animal bodies are frozen right after death. Many think it’s not scientifically valid, but the idea is to keep the bodies for many years, hoping future technology can revive them. Freezing at very low temperatures might keep the tissues good for a very long time.

There are places worldwide where people pay a lot of money to have their bodies frozen after they die. Right now, this freezing process, called cryonics, is only done after someone is officially declared dead.

Kowalski explains, “A century ago, if your heart stopped, you were gone because we didn’t have the technology to revive you. But now, we can restart hearts using CPR or defibrillators. What used to be impossible is now common.”

CPR stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. It’s an emergency procedure that combines chest compressions with artificial ventilation to manually preserve brain function and blood circulation in someone who has suffered cardiac arrest.

Cryonics, which involves freezing bodies at low temperatures, is not the same as achieving immortality (living forever). Scientists support it because low temperatures can prevent chemical changes for a very long time. They also argue that being legally dead is not the same as being dead beyond any chance of revival. Despite its growing popularity, the medical community does not officially accept cryonics as a valid procedure.

More and more people are choosing to have their bodies frozen every year. Kowalski’s wife and their three kids have decided to do this too. He talked to them about it and they understood. They think that even if there’s only a small chance, it’s worth it to possibly wake up in the future. They are hopeful about what’s ahead.

According to a study in Rejuvenation Research, when someone who has chosen cryonics dies, the team starts preserving their body right away. First, they cool the body to a temperature between 50°F and 32°F (10°C and 0°C) and use machines to artificially maintain blood flow and breathing in the body.In the second step, they remove the person’s blood and replace much of the body’s water with a special substance, like cryoprotectant ,an antifreeze for humans, to protect the body during freezing.

Next, the person is cooled to about -184°F (-120°C) and kept in a frozen state until it’s possible to wake them up. When the time arrives, if at all, they will be warmed up, the special antifreeze will be taken out of their body, any damage to their tissues will be fixed, illnesses will be treated, and the person will be made young and healthy again.

(The author Girish Linganna is a Defence, Aerospace & Political Analyst based in Bengaluru. He is also Director of ADD Engineering Components, India, Pvt. Ltd, a subsidiary of ADD Engineering GmbH, Germany. You can reach out to him at: [email protected])

 

Cryonics: Freezing for future life revival

https://newsfirstprime.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/01/WhatsApp-Image-2024-01-29-at-1.19.59-PM.jpeg

    Dennis Kowalski plans cryogenic preservation after death

    Cryonics freezes bodies for potential future revival

    Procedure involves cooling, replacing blood, freezing

In Milwaukee, a city in Wisconsin state of the USA, a man named Dennis Kowalski, plans to pay $28,000 to have his body cryogenically frozen after he passes away. He is the leader of the Cryonics Institute, a facility in Wisconsin that freezes and preserves deceased individuals. Currently, they have over 200 frozen bodies in their care. 

Cryogenic deep freezing involves preserving the body at very low temperatures to prevent decay and possibly revive it in the future.

Kowalski believes that in a century, we might have the technology to bring people back to life. He thinks it’s worth preserving your body after death because there’s a chance to gain a lot and nothing to lose.

Would you prefer to be cryogenically frozen over being buried or cremated?

Cryonics is a method where human and animal bodies are frozen right after death. Many think it’s not scientifically valid, but the idea is to keep the bodies for many years, hoping future technology can revive them. Freezing at very low temperatures might keep the tissues good for a very long time.

There are places worldwide where people pay a lot of money to have their bodies frozen after they die. Right now, this freezing process, called cryonics, is only done after someone is officially declared dead.

Kowalski explains, “A century ago, if your heart stopped, you were gone because we didn’t have the technology to revive you. But now, we can restart hearts using CPR or defibrillators. What used to be impossible is now common.”

CPR stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. It’s an emergency procedure that combines chest compressions with artificial ventilation to manually preserve brain function and blood circulation in someone who has suffered cardiac arrest.

Cryonics, which involves freezing bodies at low temperatures, is not the same as achieving immortality (living forever). Scientists support it because low temperatures can prevent chemical changes for a very long time. They also argue that being legally dead is not the same as being dead beyond any chance of revival. Despite its growing popularity, the medical community does not officially accept cryonics as a valid procedure.

More and more people are choosing to have their bodies frozen every year. Kowalski’s wife and their three kids have decided to do this too. He talked to them about it and they understood. They think that even if there’s only a small chance, it’s worth it to possibly wake up in the future. They are hopeful about what’s ahead.

According to a study in Rejuvenation Research, when someone who has chosen cryonics dies, the team starts preserving their body right away. First, they cool the body to a temperature between 50°F and 32°F (10°C and 0°C) and use machines to artificially maintain blood flow and breathing in the body.In the second step, they remove the person’s blood and replace much of the body’s water with a special substance, like cryoprotectant ,an antifreeze for humans, to protect the body during freezing.

Next, the person is cooled to about -184°F (-120°C) and kept in a frozen state until it’s possible to wake them up. When the time arrives, if at all, they will be warmed up, the special antifreeze will be taken out of their body, any damage to their tissues will be fixed, illnesses will be treated, and the person will be made young and healthy again.

(The author Girish Linganna is a Defence, Aerospace & Political Analyst based in Bengaluru. He is also Director of ADD Engineering Components, India, Pvt. Ltd, a subsidiary of ADD Engineering GmbH, Germany. You can reach out to him at: [email protected])

 

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