Houthi rebels: Obsolete F-5 and an impotent force

Share :

17-01-2024

    Houthi group in Yemen possesses an outdated F-5 fighter jet

    It is significantly different from the advanced planes used by countries like the United States

    it was manufactured by Northrop Corporation specializing in aerospace and defence

The Houthi group in Yemen possesses an outdated F-5 fighter jet, which is significantly different from the advanced planes used by countries like the United States. The United States views this old jet more as a historical artifact rather than a formidable threat.

Originally manufactured by Northrop Corporation specializing in aerospace and defence, the F-5 fighter jet was first produced in 1962 and remained in production until 1987. It is a supersonic, light fighter jet equipped with twin engines, high maneuverability, and designed for cost-effectiveness in air-to-air and air-to-ground missions.

Capable of carrying two air-to-air missiles and various bombs and missiles on seven hardpoints, the F-5 jet was primarily designed during the Cold War to be fast, affordable, and easily transportable. However, with advancements in military technology, it has become relatively outdated compared to the advanced aircraft used by countries like the United States. The United States possesses a vast array of more advanced planes, making the old F-5 relatively insignificant in terms of being a threat.

Although the F-5 jet signifies the differences in military technology across various forces and the enduring quality of such equipment, it is still operational despite its age, which sparks discussions about the varying military capabilities worldwide and their implications for global defense strategies.

The Houthi rebels in Yemen possess only one F-5 aircraft, which they acquired by seizing it from the Yemeni Air Force during the civil war. Additionally, they have some Avia B-33 attack aircraft purchased from Czechoslovakia in the 1950s, but these are non-functional. To attack their adversaries such as Saudi Arabia and the US-led coalition, the Houthis rely mainly on drones and missiles. However, their air force is no match for the modern and sophisticated air power possessed by their opponents.

(The author, Girish Linganna, is a Defence, Aerospace & Political Analyst based in Bengaluru. He is also Director of ADD Engineering Components, India, Pvt. Ltd, a subsidiary of ADD Engineering GmbH, Germany. You can reach out to him at: [email protected])

Houthi rebels: Obsolete F-5 and an impotent force

https://newsfirstprime.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/01/F5-jets.jpg

    Houthi group in Yemen possesses an outdated F-5 fighter jet

    It is significantly different from the advanced planes used by countries like the United States

    it was manufactured by Northrop Corporation specializing in aerospace and defence

The Houthi group in Yemen possesses an outdated F-5 fighter jet, which is significantly different from the advanced planes used by countries like the United States. The United States views this old jet more as a historical artifact rather than a formidable threat.

Originally manufactured by Northrop Corporation specializing in aerospace and defence, the F-5 fighter jet was first produced in 1962 and remained in production until 1987. It is a supersonic, light fighter jet equipped with twin engines, high maneuverability, and designed for cost-effectiveness in air-to-air and air-to-ground missions.

Capable of carrying two air-to-air missiles and various bombs and missiles on seven hardpoints, the F-5 jet was primarily designed during the Cold War to be fast, affordable, and easily transportable. However, with advancements in military technology, it has become relatively outdated compared to the advanced aircraft used by countries like the United States. The United States possesses a vast array of more advanced planes, making the old F-5 relatively insignificant in terms of being a threat.

Although the F-5 jet signifies the differences in military technology across various forces and the enduring quality of such equipment, it is still operational despite its age, which sparks discussions about the varying military capabilities worldwide and their implications for global defense strategies.

The Houthi rebels in Yemen possess only one F-5 aircraft, which they acquired by seizing it from the Yemeni Air Force during the civil war. Additionally, they have some Avia B-33 attack aircraft purchased from Czechoslovakia in the 1950s, but these are non-functional. To attack their adversaries such as Saudi Arabia and the US-led coalition, the Houthis rely mainly on drones and missiles. However, their air force is no match for the modern and sophisticated air power possessed by their opponents.

(The author, Girish Linganna, is a Defence, Aerospace & Political Analyst based in Bengaluru. He is also Director of ADD Engineering Components, India, Pvt. Ltd, a subsidiary of ADD Engineering GmbH, Germany. You can reach out to him at: [email protected])

Load More